Still Drifting…

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Every time I open Lightroom and see the images in the collection, I can’t help seeing something new.  A little while later, something wonderful emerges.  It’s almost, but not quite enough to make me wish we would get another good snow with wind so I can go out and capture more drifts.

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The Shape of Snow, Last One…Maybe!

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Who knows if I’ll catch sight of another set of snowdrifts as I drive along a road in an open area prone to drifting?  But, I suppose if that happens, and I have a camera, I’ll stop the car and spend time searching for the right combination of light and shadow inherent in snowdrifts everywhere.

Sony RX100 Mk5, ISO 100, 8.8mm, f/2.2, 1/1000 sec.

Silver Efex Pro 2, Preset 032 Film Noir 3, Kodak Tri-X 400TX Pro

The Shape of Snow, Pt. 4

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The other aspect of snowdrifts is the opportunity to explore light and shadow.  The shape of the snow as the wind sculpts the form creates soft curves that shapes the light in unique patterns.

Sony RX100 MkV, ISO 100, 8.8mm, f/I2.2, 1/1250 sec

Silver Efex Pro 2, Preset 032 Film Noir 1, Kodak 100 TMAX Pro

The Shape of Snow, Pt. 3

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Nature has a knack for forming lovely, organic shapes and this image is a wonderful example of what’s possible when wind and snow work together.

Sony RX100 MkV, ISO 100, 8.8 mm, f/2.2, 1/1000 sec

Silver Efex Pro 2, Preset 037 Pinhole, Kodak 100 TMAX Pro

The Shape of Snow, Pt. 2

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Winter seems to lend itself to black and white photography.  Most color has left for the season, leaving only the play of light and shadow on the landscape of mostly white.  It’s at this time I enjoy seeking out the flowing, organic forms of snowdrifts.  With the right lighting, the curves and edges create wonderful abstract forms similar to those found in areas where water and wind have worn the soft rock into amazing shapes.  But, where those took thousands, if not millions, of years to form, these can form in minutes.

Sony RX100MV, ISO 100, 12.2mm, f/2.8, 1/1250 sec

Processed with Silver Efex Pro 2, Preset 031 Film Noir 2, Llford FP4 Plus 125

Pt. 4, Breaking Rules

Click on image to enlarge.

When I started working with this image, I almost passed it by.  But, something about it kept calling me back.  I realized that it breaks some of the traditional rules I’ve learned in photography.  It’s heavily weighted to one side, making it awkward and out of balance.  It sort of follows the rules of thirds, maybe.  But the texture of the concrete is intriguing and adds its own value to the composition.  Compared to the metal support moving to the right, the concrete actually appears soft.  The metal erupting out of the concrete is well defined and rigid, and giving a sense of launching into space.  But, that’s just my interpretation, you may see it very differently.

More of my images can be seen at Northern Visions Media.