Rock, Water, Sky

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Shovel Point at Tettegouche State Park as seen from Palisade Head.

To The Horizon

Much of the western part of the U.S. consists of wide open spaces and driving through these areas exposes the traveler to amazing vistas along the way.  I can’t recall how many times we would crest a pass and see nothing but miles and miles of space all the way to the horizon.  Then you would climb again and there would be another vista of the road going on for miles and miles to the horizon.  Next time I make this trip I intend to stop more often and capture some these amazing vistas.

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Lower Falls, Yellowstone River

One of the iconic spots in Yellowstone National Park is the Lower Falls.  The views from the various overlooks are fantastic and this makes it a must for the visitor to the park.  All my images were taken from Artist’s Point.  Not only is the visitor rewarded with great views of the the falls, there are also amazing views of the “Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone.”  Of course there are so many other sights within the park and it is impossible to see it all in one day.  Just outside the southern boundary of the park is the Grand Tetons, a place I will have to return to when I have more time.

Mountain Interlude

Time to leave Smith Rock State Park and head for the Oregon coast.  The road requires the traveler to venture into tall pine forests and mountain passes.  On this journey, we travel under the gaze of the Three Sisters.

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Watchers On The Ledge

Three old friends stand together, silent observers of the landscape that lies below them.

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A Piece of Rock

As I previously mentioned, Tettegouche is one of my favorite Minnesota state parks and one of its most famous landmarks was the stone arch.  On one of our trips to the park,  my wife and I had the chance to kayak through the arch.  However, in late August of 2010, the bridge portion of the landmark collapsed into the lake and left behind a stack rather than an arch.  Because of its location, this part of Lake Superior’s north shore is often subject to large waves from storms and when that happens during frigid winter weather, the blowing spray can create unusual ice formations along the rocky shore and on the trees.

In case you haven’t figured it out, the three bottom images are from the same day, but from opposite sides.  The first two are looking south from Shovel Point, the Watcher is looking north.