Misty Rocks

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Wave action on a group of rock at the end of the south pier, Duluth entry, Canal Park.

ISO 50, 28mm, f/13, 1.6 sec, small adjustments in Adobe Lightroom and finished in Silver Efex Pro 2

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Peering Over The Edge

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This time of year in Duluth, along the seven miles of sandbar on Lake Superior known as Park Point, wave action forms amazing ice formations that often have an alien feel to them.  Each storm adds its contribution and the ice builds in layers outward from the beach.  Depending on conditions, there will be piles of ice rising high above the water, ice caves and blowholes.  Caution  is advised when exploring these formations as the lake is always in motion and you never know when one of the chunks may break off or split.    Also, the spaces between the heavier layers may have thinner ice.

Ice Breakers

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On an unseasonably warm day in Duluth, two kayakers find themselves ice bound.  I have to believe they were wearing dry suits as one of them eventually exited his kayak and used his paddle to break an opening through the ice to open water.

Before It’s Gone

On Thursday, I took time for a short visit to Duluth’s Park Point to see if the winds had blown the remaining ice into shore.  It had, but the warm temperature was making quick work of eliminating the ice along the beach.  As I walked the beach, I was able to spot a few gems amongst the larger churning chunks.  It took paying attention to the timing of the waves to get the shots without getting soaked, and I had to also pay attention the loosely piled bits of ice which was like drifts of large hail stones.  I never knew how deep I might sink or if I would slide toward the beach and land in the water.  But, if you don’t go, you don’t see.  If you don’t see, you don’t get the photo.